Setting up Master-Slave Replication with MySQL

Replication enables data from one MySQL server to be replicated on one or more other MySQL servers. Replication is mostly used as scale-out solution. In such a solution, all writes and updates take place on the master server, while reads take place on one or more slaves. This model is actually known as master-slave replication and this is the kind of replication that I will be setting up in this post.

Statement-based vs Row-based Replication

Replication as most people know it, has mostly been SQL statement propagation from master to slave. This is known as "statement-based" replication. But there is also another kind of replication that is available, "the row-based replication" and that has quite a lot of benefits. In this post I intend on highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of both the types of replication to help you choose the best one. I also follow up with my own recommendation.